You Don’t Need GraphQL

GraphQL is a technology that seems to be getting a lot of attention in the developer community at the moment. Advocates describe it as "a better REST", claming that it offers several advantages over traditional REST APIs:

  • Single request with nested results vs. multiple separate requests
  • Single endpoint for all requests vs. one endpoint per resource
  • Single evolving version vs. multiple (presumably incompatible) versions

For example, the following GraphQL query might be used to retrieve an employee record from a hypothetical service based on the MySQL "employees" sample database. In addition to the employee number, first name, and last name, the query also requests the employee's title and salary history:

{
  employee(id: 10004) {
    employeeNumber
    firstName
    lastName
    titles {
      title
      fromDate
      toDate
    }
    salaries {
      salary
      fromDate
      toDate
    }
  }
}

The response might look something like this, with some results omitted for brevity:

{
  "employeeNumber": 10004,
  "firstName": "Chirstian",
  "lastName": "Koblick",
  "titles": [
    {
      "title": "Senior Engineer",
      "fromDate": 817794000000,
      "toDate": 253370782800000
    },
    ...
  ],
  "salaries": [
    {
      "salary": 74057,
      "fromDate": 1006837200000,
      "toDate": 253370782800000
    },
    ...
  ]
}

A RESTful Implementation

The data model for the sample database is shown below:

Employees Sample Database

A typical REST API might provide access to employee, title, and salary resources as follows:

GET /employees/10004
{
  "employeeNumber": 10004,
  "firstName": "Chirstian",
  "lastName": "Koblick"
}
GET /employees/10004/titles
[
  {
    "title": "Senior Engineer",
    "fromDate": 817794000000,
    "toDate": 253370782800000
  },
  ...
]
GET /employees/10004/salaries
[
  {
    "salary": 74057,
    "fromDate": 1006837200000,
    "toDate": 253370782800000
  },
  ...
]

This is indeed more verbose than the GraphQL version. However, there is nothing preventing a REST API from providing a similar interface.

For example, the following service method (implemented using the open-source HTTP-RPC framework) returns the same information as the GraphQL query. As with the GraphQL version, all of the data is obtained with a single request:

@RequestMethod("GET")
@ResourcePath("?:employeeNumber")
public void getEmployee(List<String> details) throws SQLException, IOException {
    String employeeNumber = getKey("employeeNumber");

    Parameters parameters = Parameters.parse("SELECT emp_no AS employeeNumber, "
        + "first_name AS firstName, "
        + "last_name AS lastName "
        + "FROM employees WHERE emp_no = :employeeNumber");

    parameters.put("employeeNumber", employeeNumber);

    try (Connection connection = DriverManager.getConnection(DB_URL);
        PreparedStatement statement = connection.prepareStatement(parameters.getSQL())) {
        parameters.apply(statement);

        try (ResultSet resultSet = statement.executeQuery()) {
            ResultSetAdapter resultSetAdapter = new ResultSetAdapter(resultSet);

            for (String detail : details) {
                switch (detail) {
                    case "titles": {
                        resultSetAdapter.attach("titles", "SELECT title, "
                            + "from_date AS fromDate, "
                            + "to_date as toDate "
                            + "FROM titles WHERE emp_no = :employeeNumber");

                        break;
                    }

                    case "salaries": {
                        resultSetAdapter.attach("salaries", "SELECT salary, "
                            + "from_date AS fromDate, "
                            + "to_date as toDate "
                            + "FROM salaries WHERE emp_no = :employeeNumber");

                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            getResponse().setContentType("application/json");

            JSONEncoder jsonEncoder = new JSONEncoder();

            jsonEncoder.writeValue(resultSetAdapter.next(), getResponse().getOutputStream());
        }
    } finally {
        getResponse().flushBuffer();
    }
}

The initial query retreives the employee's number, first name, and last name from the "employees" table. Subqueries to return the employee's salary and title history are optionally attached based on the values provided in the details parameter. Column aliases are used in all of the queries to make the field names more JSON-friendly.

Callers can access the API via a standard HTTP GET request, as shown below:

GET /employees/10004?details=titles&details=salaries
{
  "employeeNumber": 10004,
  "firstName": "Chirstian",
  "lastName": "Koblick",
  "titles": [
    {
      "title": "Senior Engineer",
      "fromDate": 817794000000,
      "toDate": 253370782800000
    },
    ...
  ],
  "salaries": [
    {
      "salary": 74057,
      "fromDate": 1006837200000,
      "toDate": 253370782800000
    },
    ...
  ]
}

Additional Observations

GraphQL advocates tout its single-endpoint model as a major advantage over REST. This capability is not exclusive to GraphQL – it is certainly possible for REST APIs to be implemented using a single endpoint as well. However, such a service would probably become untenable very quickly. A collection of independent endpoints, each of which represent a specific resource or set of resources, will most likely be much more manageable in the long run.

Further, the concept of a single evolving version is not unique to GraphQL. Implementing a successful versioning strategy is difficult, and there are many ways of approaching it. However, there is nothing to preclude a REST service from providing backwards compatibility. It is simply one option among many.

Finally, adopting GraphQL requires services to be completely re-implemented using the GraphQL library. For any non-trivial application, this would most likely be a major undertaking. Additionally, it forces clients to use GraphQL as well, rather than standard HTTP operations such as GET and POST. This means that GraphQL APIs also can't be tested as easily in a web browser or using command-line utilties such as curl.

So, while there are certainly a number of compelling reasons to consider GraphQL, you don't actually need to use GraphQL to take advantage of them.

For more information on HTTP-RPC, see the project README.

Introducing Kilo

Kilo is an open-source framework for consuming REST services in iOS or tvOS. It is extremely lightweight and provides a convenient, callback-based interface that makes it easy to interact with remote APIs.

For example, the following code snippet shows how a client application might access a simple service that returns a friendly greeting. The request is executed asynchronously, and the result is printed when the call returns:

webServiceProxy.invoke(.get, path: "/hello") { (result: String?, error: Error?) in
    if let greeting = result {
        print(greeting) // "Hello, World!"
    }
}

The project’s name comes from the nautical K or Kilo flag, which means “I wish to communicate with you”:

This article introduces the Kilo framework and provides an overview of its key features.

WebServiceProxy Class

Kilo is distributed as a universal binary that will run in the iOS simulator as well as on an actual device. The framework contains a single class named WebServiceProxy that is used to issue API requests to the server.

Service proxies are initialized via init(session:serverURL:), which takes the following arguments:

  • session – a URLSession instance that is used to create service requests
  • serverURL – the base URL of the service

A service operation is initiated via one of the following methods:

public func invoke(_ method: Method, path: String,
    arguments: [String: Any] = [:], content: Data? = nil, contentType: String? = nil,
    resultHandler: @escaping (_ result: T?, _ error: Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }

public func invoke(_ method: Method, path: String,
    arguments: [String: Any] = [:], content: Data? = nil, contentType: String? = nil,
    resultHandler: @escaping (_ result: T?, _ error: Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }

public func invoke(_ method: Method, path: String,
    arguments: [String: Any] = [:], content: Data? = nil, contentType: String? = nil,
    responseHandler: @escaping (_ content: Data, _ contentType: String?) throws -> T?,
    resultHandler: @escaping (_ result: T?, _ error: Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }

All three methods accept the following arguments:

  • method – the HTTP method to execute
  • path – the path to the requested resource
  • arguments – a dictionary containing the method arguments as key/value pairs
  • content – an optional Data instance representing the body of the request
  • contentType – an optional string value containing the MIME type of the content
  • resultHandler – a callback that will be invoked upon completion of the method

The first version of the method uses JSONSerialization to decode response data. The second uses JSONDecoder to return a decodable value. The third version accepts an additional responseHandler argument to facilitate decoding of custom response content (for example, a UIImage).

All three methods return an instance of URLSessionTask representing the invocation request. This allows an application to cancel a task, if necessary.

Arguments

Like HTML forms, arguments are submitted either via the query string or in the request body. Arguments for GET, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE requests are always sent in the query string.

POST arguments are typically sent in the request body, and may be submitted as either “application/x-www-form-urlencoded” or “multipart/form-data” (determined via the service proxy’s encoding property). However, if a custom body is specified via the content parameter, POST arguments will be sent in the query string.

Any value that provides a description property may be used as an argument. This property is generally used to convert the argument to its string representation. However, Date instances are automatically converted to a 64-bit integer value representing epoch time (the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since midnight on January 1, 1970).

Additionally, array instances represent multi-value parameters and behave similarly to tags in HTML. Further, when using the multi-part form data encoding, instances of URL represent file uploads and behave similarly to tags in HTML forms. Arrays of URL values operate similarly to tags.

Return Values

The result handler is called upon completion of the operation. If successful, the first argument will contain a deserialized representation of the content returned by the server, and the second argument will be nil. Otherwise, the first argument will be nil, and the second will be populated with an Error instance describing the problem that occurred.

Note that, while service requests are typically processed on a background thread, result handlers are always executed on the application’s main thread. This allows result handlers to update the user interface directly, rather than posting a separate update operation to the main queue.

If the server returns an error response, a localized description of the error will be provided in the localized description of the error parameter. Further, if the error is returned with a content type of “text/plain”, the response body will be returned in the error’s debug description.

Example

The following code snippet demonstrates how the WebServiceProxy class might be used to access the operations of a simple math service:

// Create service proxy
let webServiceProxy = WebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: URL(string: "http://localhost:8080")!)

// Get sum of "a" and "b"
webServiceProxy.invoke(.get, path: "/math/sum", arguments: [
    "a": 2,
    "b": 4
]) { (result: Int?, error: Error?) in
    // result is 6
}

// Get sum of all values
webServiceProxy.invoke(.get, path: "/math/sum", arguments: [
    "values": [1, 2, 3, 4]
]) { (result: Int?, error: Error?) in
    // result is 10
}

Additional Information

This article introduced the Kilo framework and provided an overview of its key features. For additional information, see the the project README.

 

Dynamically Loading Table View Images in iOS

11/13/2018 Updated for Xcode 10/Swift 4.2

iOS applications often display thumbnail images in table views alongside other text-based content such as contact names or product descriptions. However, these images are not usually delivered with the initial response, but must instead be retrieved separately afterward. They are typically downloaded in the background as needed to avoid blocking the main thread, which would temporarily render the user interface unresponsive.

For example, consider this web service, which returns a list of simulated photo data:

[
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 1,
    "title": "accusamus beatae ad facilis cum similique qui sunt",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/92c952",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/92c952"
  },
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 2,
    "title": "reprehenderit est deserunt velit ipsam",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/771796",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/771796"
  },
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 3,
    "title": "officia porro iure quia iusto qui ipsa ut modi",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/24f355",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/24f355"
  },
  ...
]

Each record contains a photo ID, album ID, and title, as well as URLs for both thumbnail and full-size images; for example:

View Controller

A basic user interface for displaying results returned by this service is shown below:

Row data is stored in an array of Photo instances:

struct Photo: Decodable {
    let id: Int
    let albumId: Int
    let title: String?
    var url: URL?
    var thumbnailUrl: URL?
}

Previously loaded thumbnail images are stored in a dictionary that associates UIImage instances with photo IDs:

class ViewController: UITableViewController {
    // Row data
    var photos: [Photo]?

    // Image cache
    var thumbnailImages: [Int: UIImage] = [:]

    ...    
}

The photo list is loaded the first time the view appears. The WebServiceProxy class provided by the open-source Kilo framework is used to retrieve the data:

override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
    super.viewWillAppear(animated)

    // Load photo data
    if (photos == nil) {
        let serviceProxy = WebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: URL(string: "https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com")!)

        serviceProxy.invoke(.get, path: "/photos") { (result: [Photo]?, error: Error?) in
            self.photos = result ?? []

            self.tableView.reloadData()
        }
    }
}

Table view cells are represented by the following class, implemented using the open-source Lima layout framework:

class PhotoCell: LMTableViewCell {
    var thumbnailImageView: UIImageView!
    var titleLabel: UILabel!

    override init(style: UITableViewCell.CellStyle, reuseIdentifier: String?) {
        super.init(style: style, reuseIdentifier: reuseIdentifier)

        setContent(LMRowView(
            UIImageView(contentMode: .scaleAspectFit, width: 50, height: 50) { self.thumbnailImageView = $0 },
            LMSpacer(width: 0.5, backgroundColor: UIColor.lightGray),
            LMColumnView(spacing: 0,
                UILabel(font: UIFont.preferredFont(forTextStyle: .body), numberOfLines: 2) { self.titleLabel = $0 },
                LMSpacer()
            )
        ), ignoreMargins: false)
    }

    required init?(coder decoder: NSCoder) {
        return nil
    }
}

Cell content is generated as follows. The corresponding Photo instance is retrieved from the photos array and used to configure the cell. If the thumbnail image is already available in the cache, it is used to populate the cell's thumbnail image view. Otherwise, it is loaded from the server and added to the cache. If the cell is still visible when the image request returns, it is updated immediately:

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
    return photos?.count ?? 0
}

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    let photoCell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: PhotoCell.description(), for: indexPath) as! PhotoCell

    guard let photo = photos?[indexPath.row] else {
        fatalError()
    }

    // Attempt to load image from cache
    photoCell.thumbnailImageView.image = thumbnailImages[photo.id]

    if photoCell.thumbnailImageView.image == nil,
        let url = photo.thumbnailUrl,
        let scheme = url.scheme,
        let host = url.host,
        let serverURL = URL(string: String(format: "%@://%@", scheme, host)) {
        // Request image
        let serviceProxy = WebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: serverURL)

        serviceProxy.invoke(.get, path: url.path, responseHandler: { content, contentType in
            return UIImage(data: content)
        }) { (result: UIImage?, error: Error?) in
            // Add image to cache and update cell, if visible
            if let thumbnailImage = result {
                self.thumbnailImages[photo.id] = thumbnailImage

                if let cell = tableView.cellForRow(at: indexPath) as? PhotoCell {
                    cell.thumbnailImageView.image = thumbnailImage
                }
            }
        }
    }

    photoCell.titleLabel.text = photo.title

    return photoCell
}

Finally, if the system is running low on memory, the image cache is cleared:

override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
    super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()

    thumbnailImages.removeAll()
}

Summary

This article provided an overview of how images can be dynamically loaded to populate table view cells in iOS. Complete source code for this example can be found here.