Creating a Universal Framework in Xcode 9

A while back, I posted a script for creating a universal iOS framework (i.e. one that will run in both the simulator as well as on an actual device) in Xcode 7. The following is an updated version for use with Xcode 9. This version should work with both Swift and Objective-C projects:

FRAMEWORK=<framework name>

BUILD=build
FRAMEWORK_PATH=$FRAMEWORK.framework

# iOS
rm -Rf $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD
rm -f $FRAMEWORK-iOS.framework.tar.gz

xcodebuild archive -project $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$FRAMEWORK-iOS.xcodeproj -scheme $FRAMEWORK -sdk iphoneos SYMROOT=$BUILD
xcodebuild build -project $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$FRAMEWORK-iOS.xcodeproj -target $FRAMEWORK -sdk iphonesimulator SYMROOT=$BUILD

cp -RL $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-iphoneos $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-universal
cp -RL $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-iphonesimulator/$FRAMEWORK_PATH/Modules/$FRAMEWORK.swiftmodule/* $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-universal/$FRAMEWORK_PATH/Modules/$FRAMEWORK.swiftmodule

lipo -create $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-iphoneos/$FRAMEWORK_PATH/$FRAMEWORK $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-iphonesimulator/$FRAMEWORK_PATH/$FRAMEWORK -output $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-universal/$FRAMEWORK_PATH/$FRAMEWORK

tar -czv -C $FRAMEWORK-iOS/$BUILD/Release-universal -f $FRAMEWORK-iOS.tar.gz $FRAMEWORK_PATH $FRAMEWORK_PATH.dSYM

When located in the same directory as the .xcodeproj file, this script will invoke xcodebuild twice on a framework project and join the resulting binaries together into a single universal binary. It will then package the framework up in a gzipped tarball and place it in the same directory.

However, apps that contain “fat” binaries like this don't pass app store validation. Before submitting an app containing a universal framework, the binaries need to be trimmed so that they include only iOS-native code. The following script can be used to do this:

FRAMEWORK=$1
echo "Trimming $FRAMEWORK..."

FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH="${BUILT_PRODUCTS_DIR}/${FRAMEWORKS_FOLDER_PATH}/$FRAMEWORK.framework/$FRAMEWORK"

EXTRACTED_ARCHS=()

for ARCH in $ARCHS
do
    echo "Extracting $ARCH..."
    lipo -extract "$ARCH" "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH" -o "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH-$ARCH"
    EXTRACTED_ARCHS+=("$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH-$ARCH")
done

echo "Merging binaries..."
lipo -o "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH-merged" -create "${EXTRACTED_ARCHS[@]}"
rm "${EXTRACTED_ARCHS[@]}"

rm "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH"
mv "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH-merged" "$FRAMEWORK_EXECUTABLE_PATH"

echo "Done."

To use this script:

  1. Place the script in your project root directory and name it trim.sh or something similar
  2. Create a new “Run Script” build phase after the “Embed Frameworks” phase
  3. Rename the new build phase to “Trim Framework Executables” or similar (optional)
  4. Invoke the script for each framework you want to trim (e.g. ${SRCROOT}/trim.sh)

For more ways to simplify iOS app development, please see my projects on GitHub:

  • MarkupKit – Declarative UI for iOS and tvOS
  • HTTP-RPC – Lightweight multi-platform REST

MarkupKit 3.4 Released

MarkupKit 3.4 is now available for download and via Cocoapods. This release includes the following updates:

  • Add baseline spacing support to LMColumnView. Arranged subviews can now be spaced vertically according to their baselines rather than their bounding rectangles. Additionally, system spacing can now be used in both row and column views in iOS 11 and later.

  • Add support for directional layout margins. Callers can now define locale-aware layout margins using the layoutMarginLeading and layoutMarginTrailing properties MarkupKit adds to UIView. In iOS 11 and later, these properties map directly to the view's directionalLayoutMargins. In iOS 10 and earlier, the current text direction (left-to-right or right-to-left) is used to dynamically apply the values.

  • Add LMTableViewHeaderFooterView class. iOS 11 appears to resolve issues associated with self-sizing table view header/footer views. As a result, it is now possible to provide an LMTableViewHeaderFooterView class for hosting custom section header and footer content.

  • Add support for custom string tables. In addition to bundleForStrings, LMViewBuilder will now also look for a tableForStrings method on the document owner. This method can be used to customize the string table used to resolve localized string references, and can be used either with or without bundleForStrings.

  • Add support for named colors in asset catalogs. In addition to UIColor constants and color table values, named colors can now refer to color sets defined in asset catalogs in iOS 11 and later.

  • Drop support for bi-directional binding. Internally, MarkupKit bindings are implemented using key-value observing (KVO). While app-specific classes reliably support KVO, UIKit view types are not guaranteed to, which can cause confusion or lead to bugs. Allowing bindings from owner to view only eliminates ambiguity while still supporting the model view-view-model (MVVM) design pattern.

For more information, see the project README.

HTTP-RPC 4.2 Released

HTTP-RPC 4.2 is now available for download, as well as via Cocoapods for iOS and Maven for Java:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.httprpc</groupId>
    <artifactId>httprpc</artifactId>
    <version>...</version>
</dependency>

This release includes the following updates:

  • Refine invocation methods for Swift. Invocation methods are now parameterized, so it is no longer necessary to cast the return value to the desired type:
    open func invoke<T>(_ method: String, path: String, 
        resultHandler: @escaping (T?, Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }
    
    open func invoke<T>(_ method: String, path: String, arguments: [String: Any], 
        resultHandler: @escaping (T?, Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }

    For example:

    serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/example") { (result: UIImage?, error) in
        // Handle image result
    }
  • Add support for custom response handlers. Callers can now perform custom deserialization via a response handler callback. In Swift, the callback is a closure:
    open func invoke<T>(_ method: String, path: String, arguments: [String: Any],
        responseHandler: @escaping (Data, String) throws -> T?,
        resultHandler: @escaping (T?, Error?) -> Void) -> URLSessionTask? { ... }

    For example (using JSONDecoder to return a strongly typed result):

    serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/example", arguments: [:], responseHandler: { data, contentType in
        let decoder = JSONDecoder()
    
        return try? decoder.decode(Example.self, from: data)
    }) { (result: Example?, error) in
        // Handle custom result
    }

    In Java, the callback is defined as follows:

    public interface ResponseHandler<V> {
        public V decode(InputStream inputStream, String contentType) throws IOException;
    }

    For example (using Jackson to return a strongly typed result):

    serviceProxy.invoke("GET", "/example", mapOf(), (inputStream, contentType) -> {
        ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
    
        return objectMapper.readValue(input, Example.class);
    }, (Example result, Exception exception) -> {
        // Handle custom result
    });    

For more information, see the project README.

Dynamically Loading Table View Images in iOS

iOS applications often display thumbnail images in table views alongside other text-based content such as contact names or product descriptions. However, these images are not usually delivered with the initial request, but must instead be retrieved separately afterward. They are typically downloaded in the background as needed to avoid blocking the main thread, which would temporarily render the user interface unresponsive.

For example, consider this REST service, which returns a list of simulated photo data:

[
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 1,
    "title": "accusamus beatae ad facilis cum similique qui sunt",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/92c952",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/92c952"
  },
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 2,
    "title": "reprehenderit est deserunt velit ipsam",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/771796",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/771796"
  },
  {
    "albumId": 1,
    "id": 3,
    "title": "officia porro iure quia iusto qui ipsa ut modi",
    "url": "http://placehold.it/600/24f355",
    "thumbnailUrl": "http://placehold.it/150/24f355"
  },
  ...
]

Each record contains a photo ID, album ID, and title, as well as URLs for both thumbnail and full-size images; for example:

Photo Class

A class representing this data might be defined as follows:

class Photo: NSObject {
    var id: Int = 0
    var albumId: Int = 0
    var title: String?
    var url: URL?
    var thumbnailUrl: URL?

    init(dictionary: [String: Any]) {
        super.init()

        setValuesForKeys(dictionary)
    }

    override func setValue(_ value: Any?, forKey key: String) {
        switch key {
        case #keyPath(url):
            url = URL(string: value as! String)

        case #keyPath(thumbnailUrl):
            thumbnailUrl = URL(string: value as! String)

        default:
            super.setValue(value, forKey: key)
        }
    }
}

Since instances of this class will be populated using dictionary values returned by the web service, an initializer that takes a dictionary argument is provided. The setValuesForKeys(_:) method of NSObject is used to map dictionary entries to property values. The ID and title properties are handled automatically by this method; the class overrides setValue(_:forKey:) to convert the URLs from strings into actual URL instances.

View Controller Class

A basic user interface for displaying service results in a table view is shown below:

Row data is stored in an array of Photo instances. Previously loaded thumbnail images are stored in a dictionary that associates UIImage instances with photo IDs:

class ViewController: UITableViewController {
    // Row data
    var photos: [Photo]!

    // Image cache
    var thumbnailImages: [Int: UIImage] = [:]

    ...    
}

The photo list is loaded the first time the view appears. The WSWebServiceProxy class of the open-source HTTP-RPC library is used to retrieve the data. If the call succeeds, the response data (an array of dictionary objects) is transformed into an array of Photo objects and the table view is refreshed. Otherwise, an error message is displayed:

override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
    super.viewWillAppear(animated)

    // Load photo data
    if (photos == nil) {
        let serviceProxy = WSWebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: URL(string: "https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com")!)

        serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/photos") { result, error in
            if (error == nil) {
                let photos = result as! [[String: Any]]

                self.photos = photos.map({
                    return Photo(dictionary: $0)
                })

                self.tableView.reloadData()
            } else {
                let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "Error", message: error!.localizedDescription, preferredStyle: .alert)

                alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default))

                self.present(alertController, animated: true)
            }
        }
    }
}

Cell content is generated as follows. The corresponding Photo instance is retrieved from the photos array and used to configure the cell:

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
    return (photos == nil) ? 0 : photos.count
}

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    var cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: cellIdentifier)

    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = UITableViewCell(style: .default, reuseIdentifier: cellIdentifier)
    }

    let photo = photos[indexPath.row];

    cell!.textLabel!.text = photo.title

    // Attempt to load image from cache
    cell!.imageView!.image = thumbnailImages[photo.id]

    if (cell!.imageView!.image == nil && photo.thumbnailUrl != nil) {
        // Image was not found in cache; load it from the server

        ...
    }

    return cell!
}

If the thumbnail image is already available in the cache, it is used to populate the cell's image view. Otherwise, it is loaded from the server and added to the cache as shown below. If the cell is still visible when the image request returns, it is updated immediately and reloaded:

let serverURL = URL(string: String(format: "%@://%@", photo.thumbnailUrl!.scheme!, photo.thumbnailUrl!.host!))!

let serviceProxy = WSWebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: serverURL)

serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: photo.thumbnailUrl!.path) { result, error in
    if (error == nil) {
        // If cell is still visible, update image and reload row
        let cell = tableView.cellForRow(at: indexPath)

        if (cell != nil) {
            if let thumbnailImage = result as? UIImage {
                self.thumbnailImages[photo.id] = thumbnailImage

                cell!.imageView!.image = thumbnailImage

                tableView.reloadRows(at: [indexPath], with: .none)
            }
        }
    } else {
        print(error!.localizedDescription)
    }
}

Finally, if the system is running low on memory, the image cache is cleared:

override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
    super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()

    // Clear image cache
    thumbnailImages.removeAll()
}

Summary

This article provided an overview of how images can be dynamically loaded as needed to populate table view cells in iOS. For more ways to simplify iOS app development, please see my projects on GitHub:

  • MarkupKit – declarative UI for iOS and tvOS
  • HTTP-RPC – lightweight multi-platform REST

Caching Web Service Response Data in iOS

Many iOS applications obtain data via HTTP web services that return JSON documents. For example, the following code uses the HTTP-RPC WSWebServiceProxy class to invoke a simple web service that returns a simulated list of users as JSON. The results are stored as a dictionary and presented in a table view:

class UserViewController: UITableViewController {
    var users: [[String: Any]]! = nil

    ...

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillAppear(animated)

        if (users == nil) {
            // Load the data from the server
            AppDelegate.serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/users") { result, error in
                if (error == nil) {
                    self.users = result as? [[String: Any]]

                    self.tableView.reloadData()
                } 
            }
        }
    }

    ...
}

This works fine when both the device and the service are online, but it fails if either one is not. In some cases this may be acceptable, but other times it might be preferable to show the user the most recent response when more current data is not available.

To facilitate offline support, the response data must be cached. However, since writing to the file system is a potentially time-consuming operation, it should be done in the background to avoid blocking the main (UI) thread. Here, the data is written using an operation queue to ensure that access to it is serialized:

class UserViewController: UITableViewController {
    var users: [[String: Any]]! = nil

    var userCacheURL: URL?
    let userCacheQueue = OperationQueue()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        ...

        if let cacheURL = FileManager.default.urls(for: .cachesDirectory, in: .userDomainMask).first {
            userCacheURL = cacheURL.appendingPathComponent("users.json")
        }
    }

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillAppear(animated)

        if (users == nil) {
            // Load the data from the server
            AppDelegate.serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/users") { result, error in
                if (error == nil) {
                    self.users = result as? [[String: Any]]

                    self.tableView.reloadData()

                    // Write the response to the cache
                    if (self.userCacheURL != nil) {
                        self.userCacheQueue.addOperation() {
                            if let stream = OutputStream(url: self.userCacheURL!, append: false) {
                                stream.open()

                                JSONSerialization.writeJSONObject(result!, to: stream, options: [.prettyPrinted], error: nil)

                                stream.close()
                            }
                        }
                    }
                } 
            }
        }
    }

    ...
}

Finally, the data can be retrieved from the cache if the web service call fails. The data is read from the cache in the background, and the UI is updated by reloading the table view on the main thread:

class UserViewController: UITableViewController {
    var users: [[String: Any]]! = nil

    var userCacheURL: URL?
    let userCacheQueue = OperationQueue()

    ...

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillAppear(animated)

        if (users == nil) {
            // Load the data from the server
            AppDelegate.serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "/users") { result, error in
                if (error == nil) {
                    self.users = result as? [[String: Any]]

                    self.tableView.reloadData()

                    // Write the data to the cache
                    if (self.userCacheURL != nil) {
                        self.userCacheQueue.addOperation() {
                            if let stream = OutputStream(url: self.userCacheURL!, append: false) {
                                stream.open()

                                JSONSerialization.writeJSONObject(result!, to: stream, options: [.prettyPrinted], error: nil)

                                stream.close()
                            }
                        }
                    }
                } else if (self.userCacheURL != nil) {
                    // Read the data from the cache
                    self.userCacheQueue.addOperation() {
                        if let stream = InputStream(url: self.userCacheURL!) {
                            stream.open()

                            self.users = (try? JSONSerialization.jsonObject(with: stream, options: [])) as? [[String: Any]]

                            stream.close()
                        }

                        // Update the UI
                        OperationQueue.main.addOperation() {
                            self.tableView.reloadData()
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    ...
}

Now, as long as the application has been able to connect to the server at least once, it can function either online or offline, using the cached response data.

For more ways to simplify iOS app development, please see my projects on GitHub:

  • MarkupKit – Declarative UI for iOS and tvOS
  • HTTP-RPC – Lightweight multi-platform REST

Applying Style Sheets Client-Side in iOS

While native mobile applications can often provide a more seamless and engaging user experience than a browser-based app, it is occasionally convenient to present certain types of content using a web view. Specifically, any content that is primarily text-based and requires minimal user interaction may be a good candidate for presentation as HTML; for example, product descriptions, user reviews, or instructional content.

However, browser-based content often tends to look out of place within a native app. For example, consider the following simple HTML document:

<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0"/>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Lorem Ipsum</h1>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.</p>
    <ul>
    <li>Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.</li> 
    <li>Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.</li>
    <li>Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</li>
    </ul>
</body>
</html>

Rendered by WKWebView, the result looks like this:

Because the text is displayed using the default browser font rather than the system font, it is immediately obvious that the content is not native. To make it appear more visually consistent with other elements of the user interface, a stylesheet could be used to render the document using the system font:

<head>
    ...
    <style>
    body {
        font-family: '-apple-system';
        font-size: 10pt;
    }
    </style>
</head>

The result is shown below. The styling of the text now matches the rest of the UI:

However, while this approach may work for this simple example, it does not scale well. Different app (or OS) versions may have different styling requirements.

By applying the stylesheet on the client, the presentation can be completely separated from the content. This can be accomplished by linking to the stylesheet rather than embedding it inline:

<head>
    ...
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="example.css"/>
</head>

However, instead of downloading the stylesheet along with the HTML document, it is distributed with the application itself and applied using the loadHTMLString:baseURL: method of the WKWebView class. The first argument to this method contains the (unstlyed) HTML content, and the second contains the base URL against which relative URLs in the document (such as stylesheets) will be resolved:

class ViewController: UIViewController {
    var webView: WKWebView!

    var serviceProxy: WSWebServiceProxy!

    override func loadView() {
        webView = WKWebView()

        view = webView
    }

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        title = "Local CSS Example"

        serviceProxy = WSWebServiceProxy(session: URLSession.shared, serverURL: URL(string: "http://localhost")!)
    }

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillAppear(animated)

        serviceProxy.invoke("GET", path: "example.html") { result, error in
            if (result != nil) {
                self.webView.loadHTMLString(result as! String, baseURL: Bundle.main.resourceURL!)
            }
        }
    }
}

In this example, the document, example.html, is loaded using the HTTP-RPC WSWebServiceProxy class. The stylesheet, example.css, is stored in the resource folder of the application's main bundle:

body {
    font-family: '-apple-system';
    font-size: 10pt;
}

The results are identical to the previous example. However, the content and visual design are no longer tightly coupled and can vary independently:

For more ways to simplify iOS app development, please see my projects on GitHub:

  • MarkupKit – Declarative UI for iOS and tvOS
  • HTTP-RPC – Lightweight multi-platform REST